We Need You to Help Us Light Up the Lab

Light Up The Lab

One of the unique things about the Children’s Brain Tumor Project laboratory is how personally we all take this work. Nothing shows that quite like the hallway of our lab, which is lined with photos of children whose lives were claimed by these terrible, incurable tumors. We see these faces every day, to remind us that we are not just scientists working on cells. We are working for children, and for the families who love them, in a daily race to find new treatments. Every picture on our wall tells us the story not just of a child but of that child’s devastated family, and as we walk past each one we remember why we do what we do: to create hope. Read more

Lab Update: August 2017

These are exciting times in pediatric neuro-oncology research, and nowhere is that excitement felt more than right here in the CBTP labs. We have recently doubled in size, thanks to the generous support of our families and friends. Where once our two teams worked side by side, taking parallel paths toward our common goal, now we are four. And we couldn’t be happier about that. Read more

Family Corner: Kathy Arabia

It is always a heartwarming and emotional experience to meet with other families who have lost a child to brain cancer. I had the true pleasure to connect with a group of parents, all of whom had lost a child to the rare brain cancer gliomatosis cerebri, at the Second International Gliomatosis Cerebri Conference, which was recently held at the National Institutes of Health.

The powerful emotions we felt were highlighted by the fact that we were there with a number of the brightest neurosurgeons, neuro-oncologists, researchers, and others who were fully committed to learning more about this cancer, sharing research, and finding effective treatments so no other families would have to go through such a loss. Read more

On the Horizon: Focused Ultrasound for Brain Tumors?

Dr. Michael Kaplitt, our Vice Chair for Research, made news this summer when he became the first in New York to use Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat patients with essential tremor, just a week after the technology received FDA approval. The completely non-invasive technique uses 1,000 low-energy ultrasound waves focused on a precise spot in the brain, each individual wave sparing healthy tissue while the combined energy destroys its target. Read more

Sharing Results of Brain Tumor Research

The Children’s Brain Tumor Project made amazing progress this year, not only in terms of what we learned but also in what we shared. The fact is, getting our discoveries out into the scientific community is just as important as making them in the first place. Research is such an iterative process—we make a small but significant finding and share it by publishing an academic paper read by colleagues around the world, which they then use to advance their own work. They publish their new findings, which we then read and use to inspire our next steps. Back and forth, one step at a time, we move the science forward.

That’s why 2016 was such a big year for us. We made some very interesting findings, but we also concentrated on sharing them. The Internet is a big help here, since it shortens the time it takes to disseminate information. An accepted paper can spend months in the queue for publication, but academic journals now publish electronically in advance of print. That gets our findings into circulation much faster, and it also lets us learn from other labs in a more timely way. Read more

Lab Update: November 2016

There’s an old adage that says if you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together. Research science rarely adheres to that—investigators spend a lot of lonely hours peering into microscopes and scrolling through endless data points, all in the hope that someday all that solo work will add up to a breakthrough. We often go alone, and go far, but usually not fast.

The Children’s Brain Tumor Project has also defied that adage in that we are going fast, but together. This requires teamwork like no other—we need other labs at Weill Cornell, tissue banks around the country, and other scientists comparing notes and sharing findings—because we know we need to move quickly, and get far. Read more